Movie Criticism No Time To Die | Bitter farewell, hope for a fresh start

“No Time To Die”, the latest film in the James Bond series, is not just a farewell to its charming star, Daniel Craig. Because with Kerry Fukunaga, it seems that the 50-year-old series is set to take an unexpected turn.

Obviously, a James Bond-era series will change a lot over time. For example, it is enough to review the actors who have played the role of James Bond so far; From Sean Connery as the first James Bond movie to Timothy Dalton, Pierce Brosnan and Daniel Craig. We remember each of these James Bonds with their own image and characteristics. But at the same time, all these years, the audience has formed an image of James Bond character, which any distance from it can be costly. The main and inseparable elements of this character have rarely changed over the years, but Fukunaga has tried to make unusual changes to them in no time to die.

The core and inseparable elements of the James Bond character have seldom changed over the years, but Fukunaga has tried to make unusual changes to the film in Time for Death.

The new James Bond episode was finally aired this year due to Danny Boyle’s resignation and the subsequent pandemic outbreak. With a duration of 2 hours and 43 minutes, this film is the longest film in the series among 25 titles.

The details of the film’s story are revealed below.

Six years after Specter, everything seems to be in order to face an enjoyable espionage epic. No Time to Die is the final installment of the Daniel Craig Band film series, which began with the 2006 Royal Martin Campbell Casino. With no time to die, our fifteen-year journey with Craig around the world is over. But isn’t there a time to die, a chase worthy of this stone-faced hero? An expectation that recalls the heavy responsibility of James Bond Fukunaga.

What may have disappointed Daniel Craig’s fans in the first place is that it has plunged into the abyss of melodrama. Because at times the film is like a story about the bitter separation of the gang and his mistress Madeleine.

Craig was soon able to create a believable image for the audience as a new 007 agent. The character in these few films, gradually showed us more details and dimensions of himself. In these five films, Daniel Craig, as much as the other actors in this role, manages to create his own special image of this character. He has been able to give a deep impact to the character of the band – which is usually one-dimensional. Craig’s acting charm led the series to move away from its established and usual format. He has radically changed the movements, gestures, personal principles, tone and language of the band. But is not the change of gang from an unruly character to a family man a time to die is what we expect? A family man is probably the last thing we thought about the gang.

Madeleine’s character, played by Lea Seido, who entered the world of the band from Specter, does not have the necessary charm and traction. Even in the two-person scenes between him and the gang, everything is in the gang’s favor, and he has an almost neutral presence.

Here, however, Fucanaga has tried to lead him to discover the disturbing contradictions of his position and personality in order to paint a profound picture of him in this way. Also, there is no time to die, more than any other film in the series, it deals with the emotional struggles of the band character. For this reason, from time to time the narrative of the film stops in favor of showing his emotional tensions. What may have disappointed Daniel Craig’s fans in the first place is that it has plunged into the abyss of melodrama.

Because at times the film is like a story about the bitter separation of the band and his mistress Madeleine. Of course, this is not a problem in itself. The bottom line is that the film did not reach the melodramatic climax of a film like Casino Royale (although none of Craig’s bands after Casino Royale were able to create the dramatic atmosphere of that film).

But why is the melodrama part of the film not effective enough? Undoubtedly, much of it has to do with the chemistry of the bond between Madeleine and Madeleine. Madeleine’s character, played by Lea Seido, who entered the world of the band from Specter, does not have the necessary charm and traction. Even in the two-person scenes between him and the gang, everything is in the gang’s favor, and he has an almost neutral presence. As a result, the gang’s inner doubts and tensions seem somewhat ineffective. Her presence is not even so convincing that we can accept the gang’s attempt to forget Vesper (the band’s mistress from Casino Royale). Although Madeleine’s hidden secrets and the suspicion that she is probably the daughter of a high-ranking terrorist organizational officer add to the gang’s religiosity and paranoia about her, her almost soulless presence has made the gang’s attempt to establish a committed relationship with her less convincing. It seems.

Remy’s mimicry and face have the potential to create a spectacular villain. But his character, who sometimes wants to be reminiscent of the Joker in a caricature, does not transfer the energy and dynamism needed to create a full-blown tension to the film.

At the beginning of the film, we see that the band still has not forgotten Vesper Lind. When the gang goes to Vesper’s tomb, it intends to say goodbye to its past. But we know that it is not possible for the gang to escape from the past. The anticipation that the band’s emotional relationships will always be temporary and transient adds to the film’s emotional tension. We can say that this is a dangerous professional ransom of the gang. From the beginning, we anticipate separation and distance in the relationship between him and Madeleine. A sense of hesitation that weighs heavily on the film until the end.

It is fortunate that Fukunaga (and the recent bands) have someone like Daniel Craig. The main power of the film, as expected, depends on his presence. Craig, with his charismatic presence, allows us to cope with weaknesses related to other characters to some extent. So what a fear that Fucanaga even forgets that a James Bond movie needs a charming villain. What Safin’s character with Rami Malek’s game lacks. However, Remy’s mimicry and face have the potential to create a spectacular villain. But his character, who sometimes wants to be a cartoon reminiscent of the Joker, does not transfer the energy and dynamism needed to create a full-blown tension to the film.

Fukunaga portrays a particularly tense relationship between the band and its mother country. This ironic look becomes even more striking when we consider the fact that the gang is in fact a tool for its superiors, and it is this idea that sheds light on the tension between him and the authorities.

While the film initially introduces him as a mysterious and unknown character, he eventually becomes a one-dimensional villain. A character whose childhood traumas have turned him into a psychopath and has a vague ideological motive for destroying the world. While perhaps the same old idea of a kingdom over the world is much more tangible than his confusing explanations of his motives. None of the film’s negative characters benefit from Bluefeld’s hypnotic appeal (here in the form of Christopher Waltz).

But to be able to talk more accurately about the various dimensions of Craig’s last James Bond, it may be helpful to refer to previous films and the context in which the Bond films of each period were formed. Band films have been tied over time in response to the prevailing trend in cinema of their time. For example, James Connery’s early bands were formed in the context of Hitchcock’s terrifying films and hardbody noirs. Pierre Brosnan’s gangs tried to compete with James Cameron’s films. Daniel Craig’s bands, meanwhile, are linked to 9/11, the Bourne identity film series, and the work of Christopher Nolan. Band films have also explored different cultural, social, and political contexts from time to time.

Although the gang travels between different countries, it seems that it has no place to stay. Someone who has less space, film by film

Daniel Craig’s first James Bond film, Casino Royale (a close adaptation of Ian Fleming’s 1953 novel), was made at a time when espionage was defined by Bourne’s animated and pessimistic films. At Casino Royale, the seriousness of a character like Matt Damon in the Bourne movie series can be traced to the character of Daniel Craig. A figure who was considered a rougher and more violent character than Pierre Brosnan. We mentioned earlier that band movies depend on contemporary backgrounds.

Because in all these films we are dealing with a man who is in a political dilemma. Contemporary films engage their main characters with various existential challenges, forcing them to look at themselves again. Like where Safin faces the band, he uses this stereotypical interpretation that we are not very different from each other, and goes on to list the similarities between himself and the band. But as we have said, Fukunaga does not succeed in highlighting the inner tension of the gang by creating an influential villain. So the confrontations between the two are even more frustrating at times.

In the new film, the band is retiring once again. Apparently enjoying his quiet life in Jamaica, he is at the same time dealing with the emotional issues of his past. He broke up with his mistress Madeleine five years ago after an accident in Italy.

At the moment, while the gang’s longtime enemy, Bluefeld, is being held in a tightly guarded prison, he realizes that he must confront another villain this time. So it’s not long before CIA’s friend and colleague at the CIA, Felix, played by Jeffrey Wright, comes to him to give him a new mission. The mission is to arrest a Russian scientist who has just disappeared with a deadly weapon. But the gang mission, as expected, is gradually becoming larger and more complex. When we realize that this weapon acts like a deadly virus and is a threat to human life. It is clear from this idea that we can ironically link the new James Bond to the outbreak of the pandemic.

We have usually seen the James Bond character to a great extent in connection with his job. Someone whose job is primarily related to defending the country. But in the James Bond Craig films, the idea has faded somewhat. So that there is no time to die, we can not consider the gang specifically belonging to a country. Here, on the other hand, Fukunaga has tried to portray a particularly tense relationship between the gang and its mother country. This ironic look becomes even more striking when we consider the fact that the gang is in fact a tool for its superiors, and it is this idea that illuminates the tension between him and the authorities. Of course, all of them respect and admire him. This respectful instrumental look can be seen in the brief memorial service for the band at the end of the film.

Fukunaga portrays the relationships between the characters with skepticism and uncertainty. Of course, this cold atmosphere along with distrust is an integral part of the atmosphere of spy movies. Here, too, we see that this skepticism can even affect the warm and emotional relationship between the band and Madeleine. In a way that creates a five-year gap between the two. This uncertainty is like a warning against blind loyalty.

For this reason, the only thing that seems to be worth loyalty is a moral ideal. An ideal that’s seemingly transcends the geopolitical landscape of these films, although the gang’s narrative actions and conflicts ultimately mean the same East-West dichotomy. But Fukunaga tries to take a sarcastic approach to the idea by designing mezzanines where uncertainty ripples (for example, the Swedish Linus Sandgren depicts scenes of dialogue between characters with a ray of light breaking through the frame).

In addition, from time to time we see the band alone in the frame. Moments when he is stuck in the vast space around him. Although he travels between different countries, he seems to have no place to stay. Someone who has less space, film by film. Fukunaga also links the constant movement of the band between different perspectives with his inner journey. The path that the band takes throughout the film is constantly in the direction of his recovery and recovery. As his relationship with Madeleine is revived throughout the narrative, though it does not have a happy ending. The last moment of the band’s presence in the film is a sad farewell to a hero who no longer prefers to move. Where he heroically welcomes death and does not try to save himself.

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