Apple has sued Israeli company Pegasus

Apple has sued NSO, the Israeli spy software maker Pegasus and its owner. Apple accuses NSO of hacking iPhones with Pegasus.

Pegasus Spyware hacks both iPhones and Android phones, allowing access to messages, photos and emails, recording phone calls, and secretly turning on the phone’s camera and microphone.

The NSO says it is developing its software to track “terrorists” and criminals.

But it has been reported worldwide that Pegasus has been used to spy on political and civil activists, journalists and politicians, and political dissidents.

The NSO says it provides Pegasus only to the judicial, military, law enforcement and security agencies of countries with a good human rights record.

However, three weeks ago, the United States blacklisted the company because Pegasus “enables foreign governments to transnationally suppress, specific practices of authoritarian governments that target dissidents, journalists and activists.”

The NSO regretted the US government’s decision and said it was appealing.

Apple’s lawsuit comes after other tech companies criticized NSO, including Microsoft, Meta (formerly Facebook), Google owner Alphabet, and Cisco Systems.

Apple wrote in a blog post that its purpose in the lawsuit is to hold the NSO and its owner (Oswego Technologies) accountable for “monitoring and targeting iPhone users.”

“To prevent future misuse or harm to iPhone users, Apple also calls for a permanent ban on NSO from using all of its software, services and products.”

Apple Corps sued NSO spyware in 2021 for “targeted and coordinated attack on Apple customers” .

Apple has accused the maker of Pegasus of creating more than 100 fake Apple IDs for its software attacks.

The tech giant said its servers had not been hacked, but that the NSO had tampered with its servers and used them to attack Apple users.

Apple has also accused the NSO of providing espionage consulting services, but Insau says it only sells its products and does not provide advice.

Apple prides itself on its commitment to privacy. This is the main selling point of its devices.

So it is no surprise that a company that ostensibly seeks to circumvent Apple’s security features may force the tech giant to react.

But that’s not the only reason Apple has reacted.

Not all hackers are considered equal. NSO customers are state-owned, or, as Apple puts it, “government-sponsored.”

The NSO says it only works with organizations and governments with a good human rights record.

In this regard, the company has tried to differentiate itself from underground hackers who commit criminal acts.

Apple has denied the allegations in a lawsuit filed by the NSO.

Apple points out that no matter who or what motivated the group, if we try to hack our products, we will take action.

But the depth of the problem is a little more than that.

Apple thinks it is easier and more politically pleasing to sue a private company than to sue governments that are said to use the technology.

Apple says it has been drawn into an ongoing arms race with the NSO because the Israeli company is “constantly upgrading its malware and methods and trying to overcome Apple’s security upgrades.”

Apple has claimed all costs and damages in the lawsuit, including $ 10 million, from the NSO and said it will donate it to cyber research teams, including Citizen Lab, the University of Toronto cyber research team that first discovered the Pegasus attacks. .

The NSO says its products have “saved the lives of thousands around the world” and “provided governments with legal tools to combat child sexual harassment and terrorists operating in a safe haven for technology.”

“The

Apple has sued NSO, the Israeli spy software maker Pegasus and its owner. Apple accuses NSO of hacking iPhones with Pegasus.

Pegasus Spyware hacks both iPhones and Android phones, allowing access to messages, photos and emails, recording phone calls, and secretly turning on the phone’s camera and microphone.

The NSO says it is developing its software to track “terrorists” and criminals.

But it has been reported worldwide that Pegasus has been used to spy on political and civil activists, journalists and politicians, and political dissidents.

The NSO says it provides Pegasus only to the judicial, military, law enforcement and security agencies of countries with a good human rights record.

However, three weeks ago, the United States blacklisted the company because Pegasus “enables foreign governments to transnationally suppress, specific practices of authoritarian governments that target dissidents, journalists and activists.”

The NSO regretted the US government’s decision and said it was appealing.

Apple’s lawsuit comes after other tech companies criticized NSO, including Microsoft, Meta (formerly Facebook), Google owner Alphabet, and Cisco Systems.

Apple wrote in a blog post that its purpose in the lawsuit is to hold the NSO and its owner (Oswego Technologies) accountable for “monitoring and targeting iPhone users.”

“To prevent future misuse or harm to iPhone users, Apple also calls for a permanent ban on NSO from using all of its software, services and products.”

Apple Corps sued NSO spyware in 2021 for “targeted and coordinated attack on Apple customers” .

Apple has accused the maker of Pegasus of creating more than 100 fake Apple IDs for its software attacks.

The tech giant said its servers had not been hacked, but that the NSO had tampered with its servers and used them to attack Apple users.

Apple has also accused the NSO of providing espionage consulting services, but Insau says it only sells its products and does not provide advice.

Apple prides itself on its commitment to privacy. This is the main selling point of its devices.

So it is no surprise that a company that ostensibly seeks to circumvent Apple’s security features may force the tech giant to react.

But that’s not the only reason Apple has reacted.

Not all hackers are considered equal. NSO customers are state-owned, or, as Apple puts it, “government-sponsored.”

The NSO says it only works with organizations and governments with a good human rights record.

In this regard, the company has tried to differentiate itself from underground hackers who commit criminal acts.

Apple has denied the allegations in a lawsuit filed by the NSO.

Apple points out that no matter who or what motivated the group, if we try to hack our products, we will take action.

But the depth of the problem is a little more than that.

Apple thinks it is easier and more politically pleasing to sue a private company than to sue governments that are said to use the technology.

Apple says it has been drawn into an ongoing arms race with the NSO because the Israeli company is “constantly upgrading its malware and methods and trying to overcome Apple’s security upgrades.”

Apple has claimed all costs and damages in the lawsuit, including $ 10 million, from the NSO and said it will donate it to cyber research teams, including Citizen Lab, the University of Toronto cyber research team that first discovered the Pegasus attacks. .

The NSO says its products have “saved the lives of thousands around the world” and “provided governments with legal tools to combat child sexual harassment and terrorists operating in a safe haven for technology.”

“The NSO will continue to defend the truth.”

will continue to defend the truth.”

Pegasus; Malware sold by Israeli company to ‘authoritarian countries’ for espionage

Many human rights activists, journalists and lawyers around the world have been targeted by malware that an Israeli company has sold to authoritarian countries.

According to media reports, the telephone numbers of 50,000 people were controlled through this company.

It is not clear where this list came from and whose phones were hacked.

The Israeli company “NSO” has denied any wrongdoing in this regard. The company is active in security monitoring.

The company says the malware is intended to fight criminals and terrorists and is sold only to the security agencies, police and armies of countries with a good track record of human rights.

The company said in a statement that the initial investigation, which led to the report, was based on “incorrect estimates and unproven theories.”

The report on the company and its clients was written by a non-governmental organization called Forbidden Stories and Amnesty International.

This malware is called “Pegasus”. The Washington Post, The Guardian, Le Monde and 14 other media outlets reported on Pegasus on Sunday.

Pegasus has infected both Android phones and Apple iPhones. The malware allows governments to secretly activate the microphones of telephone devices while accessing text messages, photos, emails and phone calls.

An examination of the telephones whose numbers are published in the list shows that more than half of them were infected with this spyware.

More than 180 journalists are said to be on the list. Among the journalists who worked for AFP, Cyanide, The New York Times, Al Jazeera.

The names and numbers of two women who were close to the two slain journalists can also be seen in between. One is Jamal Khashgechi from Saudi Arabia and the other is Cecilio Pinda Berto, who was killed in a road accident.

The list also includes the names of some heads of state and government, as well as members of the Arab royal family and big business executives.

The names of those who were the target of these attacks will be published soon.

Two weeks ago, UNSAW issued a 32-page statement outlining the company’s human rights rules and commitments. But Amnesty International called the statement meaningless and said it was more like a “propaganda brochure”.

“The new allegations hurt people more, but do not pose a material problem for the company: ‘There are very few companies that can build such an offensive spy tool,'” said Joe Tide, a BBC cyber correspondent.

WhatsApp messengers complained to NSO in 2019 that it was behind the attack on 1,400 phones.

At the time, the NSO denied any wrongdoing. But the company was banned from using WhatsApp.

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